Category Archives: music

The Great Halloween Playlist – Volume 2

werewolvesWelcome to The Great Halloween Playlist – Volume Two! You can find the previous volume here!

Halloween is my favorite holiday and it’s the only other one besides Christmas that takes up the whole month. From October 1st to the 31st, it’s Halloween. And a month long holiday needs a soundtrack, it needs holiday music.

And I’ve been around the internet, I’ve seen the “best” lists for Halloween tunes. Some are good, some are bad and all include “Thriller”. But, I have my own list. My own Halloween playlist. And, yes, their true form is that of mix cds. I’m going to share this playlist, focusing on each cd, each volume, per post.

Two things to note before I start. There’s a good amount of instrumental music in each volume. Many of those tracks are video game remixes, mostly found from Overclocked Remix. There’s movie soundtracks too, but I just wanted you to know that music from Castlevania, Doom and Resident Evil shows up quite a bit.

Second, everything is personal and subjective. If you love these, great! If you don’t, make your own. Send me your list! Maybe you’ll inspire me to create another volume in this playlist of mine. Now, I’m done with disclaimers.

Fun fact about this volume, it was made at the same time as the first! It would be an annual undertaking afterwards, but I didn’t know that the first year. So, I went for broke with the first two and they act as companion pieces to each other.

Thus, we listen to Hallows’ Eve: Volume Two.

1. “Ghostbusters” by Ray Parker Jr.

The first song on each of these volumes is an important decision. If you’re listening to this playlist in cd form, the perfect form, it’s even more important. I’ve tried to keep each first song a fun one, because you don’t want a happy Halloween mood shut down with something more somber. But, a happy Halloween song can lift your somber mood! So…Ghostbusters”!

2. “Shikashi’s Dream” by anterroir

The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask is a creepy game. That giant moon just keeps looking at you…watching. The characters in the game aren’t that much better and there’s always something a bit off about them. This song could be the theme for any of them. Apart from the game, it’s the song you hear when you find a lone cottage in the woods, where you shouldn’t be. There’s something off about it too. Leave.

3. “Mitternacht” by E Nomine

Mitternacht means Midnight! What’s scarier than midnight during Halloween! And checkout that beat. I don’t know about your experiences with German techno, so Happy Halloween, I give you the treat that is E Nomine!

4. “Panic of the Undead” by Noppz

“Panic of the Undead”, a remix from the game Zombies Ate My Neighbors, is a fun tune that has that uneasy carnival vibe we find so much during October. There might be zombies, sure, but there’s a Ferris wheel that’s moving on it’s own and a clown that’s just laughing for no reason. Even the giant teddy bears seem to have teeth. This song is the tilt-a-whirl.

5. “Flame” by Bell X1

I like an October song that feels like Autumn as well. “Flame” paints that picture. Dark nights after it’s been raining, toasting marshmallows in a haunting light. It’s romantic too, with that deep sense of unrequited longing and sometimes that can get a bit unnerving too. It might not be about ghosts and ghouls but it creates a scene that leaves room for them.

6. “Clairvoyant Eulogy” by The Orichalcon

The creepiest Pokémon track from the creepiest Pokémon town. Lavender Town knows it has ghosts and the villagers just live with it! This source tune will come back in a later volume because it’s just so haunting. That repetitive opening, that sorrowful chorus, it fits the spirits that are still living in our house so well. Grab a flashlight before you go to bed.

7. “Thriller” by Michael Jackson

Hey, look, it’s “Thriller” on a Halloween playlist! Guess I’m a freaking sheep! Why else would I put this funky, rocking, so dance-able-it-makes-the-dead-groove song on my list? It’s probably the biggest and most obvious Halloween song out there, and even if you don’t like it, it has to be here. It’s earned it.

8. “The Accursed Seal” by Juan Medrano

A remix of “Bloody Tears” from Castlevania II was always going to end up on this playlist. It just so happens that Juan Medrano’s mix rocks too hard to ignore. It’s one of the harder songs throughout all the volumes, with that crying guitar just looking for someone to set it free. There’s that carousel-like bridge but it gets right back to business. This song chooses action over chills when it comes to vampires.

9. “The Twilight Zone” by Rush

The Twilight Zone is one of the best shows I never watch enough. Rush captures the sense of eeriness and otherworldliness that the show did so effortlessly. They wrap references and images in an already fantastic song, with that trotting bass and those almost teasing “nananas”. If a show like The Twilight Zone doesn’t deserve a song during Halloween, then nothing does. Also, 2112 is a fantastic album.

10. “Deadside Dance” by Alexander Previert

I’m such a sucker for voice samples in songs. “Deadside Dance” is full of moody and corny pieces of dialog, but, combined with the relentless beat of this mix, they create a spooky atmosphere of shadow and magic. We’re dealing with the end of the world and crossing over to the land of the dead here. You, like myself, don’t even need to have played the Nintendo 64 game to appreciate this song during those overcast evenings.

11. “Fatal” by RZA

The only good thing to come out of Blade: Trinity and I’m sure RZA could have put this out without that toothless vampire film. This song is the complete opposite of the movie, it’s all bite. Have vampires ever sounded this BA before? RZA makes them sound so frustrated, so ready to take back the night. It might be about Dracula, it might be about you. The important thing to remember is to not cross (get it?) a vampire in the night. (Also, I made that video more than ten years ago).

12. “My Loved Ones Are Gone” by Psycho Crusher

There hasn’t been a lot of sorrow on this volume but,  when it does shows up, it works. “Shikashi’s Dream” and “Clairvoyant Eulogy” had it and so does this song. It’s brutal, yes, like the moment you bust into that evil house and start cutting your way through the undead. But, you’ve lost many to get here and you’re not sure you’re going to make it out alive. How can you trust a guitar that sounds so heartbroken? That’s when it’s the most desperate!

13. “X-Files (UNKLE Variation On a Theme Surrender Sounds Session #10)” by Mark Snow

I really do mean to get back into the The X-Files. I think I’m in the middle of the third season? I remember an episode with Jack Black. For the purpose of this playlist, it doesn’t matter because the main theme from the show is strong enough to stand alone. It’s so eerie and evocative that’s it’s easier to understand why this was the one of the most recognizable tunes of the 90s. Even if you didn’t watch the show, you knew to be creeped out by this song. And this version from the last movie is a great variation that might even improve on the original.

14. “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” by Blue Oyster Cult

And classic rock is the gift that keeps on giving. I’d say it’s not as woodsy and Lovecraftian as Donovan’s “Season of the Witch” but this song is haunting in it’s own way. The images of blue candles, ghosts and lost loved ones fit the holiday well and the bridge is right out of The Twilight Zone. It helps that it’s one of the best rock songs of it’s time.

15. “Neighburgers” by Protricity

Zombies Ate My Neighbors are back! And on the same volume! What might have been a glaring mistake made by yours truly has turned into a happy accident as this mix is darker and a lot more teasing. It rocks a little more, feels less like a carnival and more like a chase you can’t escape. It’s rainy and suburbia is dark.

16. “Halloween (Speedy Mix)” by Aqua

We return to Aqua’s helium-induced singing for the StepMania version of their song “Halloween”. It’s quicker, shorter and would work well on Dance Dance Revolution. Not much to add, other than I like the song so much, I found a way to get it on this playlist twice.

17. “Blood Bath” by Mazedude

I told you we would return to Doom II‘s Into Sandy’s City” and so we have. The other mix, “31 Seconds”, was a somber piece of cheese wiz. “Blood Bath” is lactose intolerant and sets out to be horror show. The title seems all too appropriate. It’s heavy, it’s scary, it feels like the dark Halloween nights we don’t want to be part of. But, with a soundtrack this good, maybe it’s worth the risk. And the axe in the back.

18. “Werewolves of London” by Warren Zevon

After “Blood Bath”. we needed to end on a lighter note. And sure, the werewolves have taken over, but it seems so fashionable. They’re hanging out with the Queen, for pumpkin’s sake! There’s still elements of danger, such as lungs being ripped out, but, mostly, Warren Zevon is more interested in their perfect hair. I’d rank this alongside “Thriller” in being required Halloween listening.

The Great Halloween Playlist – Volume 1

79901561-image_561eb20db805fWelcome to The Great Halloween Playlist – Volume One! You can find the volume two here!

Halloween is my favorite holiday and it’s the only other one besides Christmas that takes up the whole month. From October 1st to the 31st, it’s Halloween. And a month long holiday needs a soundtrack, it needs holiday music.

And I’ve been around the internet, I’ve seen the “best” lists for Halloween tunes. Some are good, some are bad and all include “Thriller”. But, I have my own list. My own Halloween playlist. And, yes, their true form is that of mix cds. I’m going to share this playlist, focusing on each cd, each volume, per post.

Two things to note before I start. There’s a good amount of instrumental music in each volume. Many of those tracks are video game remixes, mostly found from Overclocked Remix. There’s movie soundtracks too, but I just wanted you to know that music from Castlevania, Doom and Resident Evil shows up quite a bit.

Second, everything is personal and subjective. If you love these, great! If you don’t, make your own. Send me your list! Maybe you’ll inspire me to create another volume in this playlist of mine. Now, I’m done with disclaimers.

Thus, we begin with Hallows’ Eve: Volume One.

1. “Monster Mash” by Bobby “Boris” Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers

Cheese and Halloween are best friends and this song is a no-brainer. I’m almost embarrassed to have this on the playlist, it’s so obvious. But, it represents an era that brought about the first monster movies and B-movie pleasures.  It’s a required addition, yes, but it’s a fun way to start of the holiday season.

2. “Castlemania” by AmIEviL

I love the energy in this one. It’s an old mix from the site but it still has life. It’s not a creepy song, at least not until the end, but the original tracks from the NES game have a gothic funk to them.

3. “White Claudia” by K. Praslowicz

I’ll be the first to admit that I like “spooky” not “horror”. So, no, I haven’t played the Silent Hill games. I’ve seen them played, I’ve read about them and even started the second one for about two hours. But, they’re too much for me. Luckily, I can handle the music and this song remixes the track in a grungy, creepy fashion that feels like an old Japanese horror film from the 80s.

4. “Halloween” by Aqua

I know enough about Aqua to tell you that their second album, Aquarius, is the superior one. It’s also the album that gave us this silly song that still has a way of building up anxiety. No, it’s not “Thriller”, even with a silly narration but it represents the comedy of the season and an ode to slasher films.

5. “31 Seconds” by John Revoredo

This is the first track on this playlist that mixes creepy with that sad, lonely feeling you get during October. Those voice samples recall 50s B-movies but the piano pulls the original’s metal qualities back to something more human. This isn’t the last time we’ll see “Into Sandy’s City” remixed, as the original is a killer and has a lot to play around with. But, this mix fits nicely here to add a somber mood to what’s has been some frontloaded silliness.

6. “Somebody’s Watching Me (Single Version)” by Rockwell

What I like about “Somebody’s Watching Me” is that, yes, it’s silly, but it’s still makes you look around to make sure you’re not being followed. I think a good, cheesy Halloween song can still bring the goosebumps. Halloween is us having fun at death’s expense, but death is still watching us as we laugh. Maybe “Somebody’s Watching Me” isn’t that deep, but it might make you check under your bed before you go to sleep.

7. “The 2nd Law – Isolated System” by Muse

I’m not a Muse fan, even though I keep finding Muse tracks that I like. This song was part of the opening credits of World War Z, and it’s now connected with zombies for me. That makes this the first zombie track of the playlist! Like “31 Seconds”, this song is sad and creepy. If I’ve had too much caffeine,  it’s probably stressing me out. It paints the picture of gray skies, falling leaves and not being able to trust anyone.

8. “This Is Halloween” by Danny Elfman

Maybe the closest Halloween has to a “Rudolph the Red Nose Reindeer” for music. Danny Elfman is able to create a piece of music that might creep out younger listeners, but it’s all in good fun. If Christmas music is about reminding us of snowflakes and cookies, this song is about wolfmen and bog monsters. It’s a tour, if you will, through what makes Halloween so much fun. It’s also, surprisingly, the only real, full Halloween song in a Nightmare Before Christmas. 

9. “Lost Sanctuary” by Daknit and Eric Dude

I’ll show throughout this playlist that a repetitive, creepy riff will freak me right out. There’s nothing technically impressive with this song, it doesn’t change much throughout it’s four and a half minutes, but it gives me the willies. It’s persistent and lackadaisical, like a stalker in the woods with all the time in the world. Gah, just typing that while listening to this song creeped me out! You’re a chicken! YOU!

10. “(Ghost) Riders in the Sky” by Johnny Cash

An old song that hasn’t been bettered since Johnny Cash got his hand’s on it. He’s able to take this song that’s part country living, part morality warning and turn it into something that fits a leaf-covered cemetery. Is it his voice, that already has a haunting rasp? Is it that Cash even seems a bit unnerved by the sight of these ghost riders? I mean, if Johnny Cash is shook up, who am I to pretend to be brave?

11. “The Predator” by E-Type

I mean, this about vampires, right? It has to be! I never saw the movie but it feels like this would have fit for Jennifer’s Body. That was vampire film, right? Also, who says we can’t dance during Halloween? And, yes, I have a whole story for this song laid out, about a boy in college watching all his friends get taken out by this girl, and he’s the only who believes she’s a vampire, so he hunts her down and they have a big fight in the school’s chem lab which catches on fire and they end up out the window into a busy freeway and she gets away but he was right, dammit! He was RIGHT!

12. “In the House – In a Heartbeat” by John Murphy

As unnerving as they get, really. The track is from one of the most intense scenes of the excellent 28 Days Later but that guitar carries the song out of the movie and into every October. You can just feel your blood pressure go up as that unrelenting piano gives the sense of escalation without ever picking up speed. Axes in doors, window’s breaking, something on the roof. It’s Halloween!

13. “Season of the Witch” by Donovan

Donovan is one of the greats and here he creates a trippy, twangy creepshow. Is he losing his mind or is something really after him? All he knows is it must be the Season of the Witch. This is a song that works during anytime of day, making mornings just as eerie as nights. That organ doesn’t help matters. You know who plays organs? Witches.

14. “Wet Grass Inspired” by AmIEvil

Diablo is another game that freaked me out when I was younger so I’ve never played it all the way through. AmIEvil (he’s back, baby!) takes the creepy, atmospheric tune that is “Tristam” and folks it up a bit. There’s a chill in the air and it still feels at home with a forest-cloaked village. I wouldn’t want to get lost in these woods.

15. “Disturbia” by Rihanna

Let’s take a moment and be thankful for Rihanna. Not every generation gets a Rihanna. Which means not every generation gets a “Disturbia”. Still one of her best, it’s also the perfect track for any Halloween party. The song is celebrating the chaos, all while lamenting being trapped in this upside down world. It’s a haunted house of a song that spills out into to the neighborhood. It keeps us dancing while we’re trying to remember if all the knives are put safely away.

16. “Grindhouse (Main Titles) by Robert Rodriguez

The last track of the first volume of this playlist and we close out with filth and debauchery. The music is from the opening titles of the only good film from the double feature Grindhouse. Planet Terror is a silly, schlocky zombie film but it knows it. Likewise, this sax-guitar sleezefest knows what it’s about. Zombies, blood, burnt out cars and empty hospitals. Halloween can be silly but it can also bring out the punk in all of us and while that might be a little funny, it can be dangerous as well.

Music is the Secret Weapon of Indie Games

At one point, I was incredibly behind in the world of video games. I had spent time away due to college life and budgetary reasons. But then, when my financial situation stabilized, I upgraded my laptop situation and with the help of many Steam Sales, I began to close the gap of time lost.

I finally played Doom 3 and Fallout 3 and the Arkham series and other big budget games I had missed out on during their releases. The older games I wanted to play were cheaper and that meant they were the games I was tackling first. No surprise.

It was a surprise, however, that I started trying out indie games. I had moved away from video games around 2006 and missed out on the rise of this world. If Braid was the unofficial beginning of this bright new era, then I was wearing sunglasses. I didn’t read articles about these games, I didn’t hear people talk about them. I was oblivious.

But Overclocked Remix changed that with one ReMix. They posted a track by contributor Dale North for the game To the Moon. It was a mix for a game that I had never heard about. The write-up for the song had a positive review for the game itself, especially the soundtrack. Combined with SNES-style graphics and a relatively cheap price, I was intrigued.

As a game, To the Moon was fine, more of an interactive movie than a game. But the story tore my heart in half, so it left an impression. And the music was as melancholy as the narrative, over-emotional and infectious. Too the Moon helped me realize that there was another world of games that I had missed. It wasn’t just the big titles like Bioshock or X-COM, but this new crop of indie projects.

Binding of Issac must have been the next game I tried. The Zelda-esque dungeon-crawling was something I immediately understood but the presentation was unlike anything I had played before. And I found the game’s soundtrack to be absolutely fascinating. It was dark, exciting, creepy and atmospheric. It felt like a carnival or haunted house, it has a sense of humor in it’s despair. It was also the first game I watched others stream, which means it opened a whole other world for me.

I found Faster Than Light soon after and fell head over heel. It’s a great game that feels like an action movie version on Oregon Trail, but, you know, in space. It’s difficult but incredibly satisfying. Even when you lose, you don’t feel like giving up. It’s endlessly entertaining and imaginative. I love it. And the soundtrack is killer.

I bought the soundtrack, actually. It’s on Bandcamp and I find it a great listen apart from the game. The battle music is thrilling but the tunes that play when you’re simply exploring are wonderful. They feel timeless, like the soundtrack has always been around. It creates the feeling of traveling through endless space and threatening nebulas perfectly.

Bastion also has a great soundtrack, which is good because the gameplay is, as best, fine. Actually, the whole presentation of the game is beautiful, with gorgeous graphics and a process of growing the world as you grow. But, still, it’s the music that I remember the most. It has a rustic soundtrack, filled with folksy guitar and lyrics that reminded me of the show Firefly. I can’t think of another game with music like Bastion.

Crypt of the Necrodancer is all about the music and it works because the tunes are great. You want to move on the beat of the current song, lest you die. It starts to become second nature because all the tracks are funky enough that you start nodding your head as you play. It feels like it could have existed back on the SNES, but I don’t think those games had the technology for the soundtrack. It music is a bit more intricate than what I remember from the early 90s. I might be wrong, because the soundtrack fits with the pixel art of the game so well.

I say all of this because it’s something I think modern video games have lost. I loved Bioshock but I couldn’t tell you if it had music or not. Nor can I hum anything from League of Legends, Arkham City or the new Fallout series. As games have become more cinematic, they’ve gone the route of having large, orchestral soundtracks that lack the memorable tunes of titles of old.

But indie games are smaller. They can’t afford orchestras. They get individuals who make smaller, more intimate music for the games. Because of the limitations, personality is more important than scope. They recall a time when video game music was memorable, when you would play certain levels just to hear the music. And now with Spotify and other streaming options, we can listen to that music whenever we’d like. The sound is quirkier, or maybe it wants to be more emotional, or has it more character. It’s not afraid to show it’s sensitive side or be silly. These days, it feels like, bigger games are less likely to experiment with their soundtracks. Or perhaps, because they’re longer, they’re afraid to play the same music over and over. A game like The Binding of Issac can repeat it’s creepy tunes on a more regular basis because you’re only on those levels for minutes at a time.

As someone whose iPod (yes, a classic, with the clickwheel and everything) is filled with video game remixes, I have a special place in my heart for the memorable side of video games. Music is one of the most important factors of those memories. Maybe the PS2/XBox/Gamecube era was the last time musical themes were an important factor for developers. Halo had a great soundtrack with an iconic theme, as did The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind (so much so that it’s carried on through the rest of the series). But these days, it’s the indie games that are carrying on the tradition of catchy, interesting video game music. It’s their secret weapon.

Evolve – An Album Review

imagine-dragons-evolveImagine Dragons deliver their new album to us and I’m disappointed by the results. Titled Evolve, it feels like one step forward, two steps back for the band. While there are songs I enjoy from the album, especially the singles that were released leading up to Evolve, the general vibe is underwhelming.

I’m under no illusions that the previous Imagine Dragons albums were conceptual masterpieces. But they felt stronger as a whole, even if they could be a bit bloated. Here, there’s too few songs that stand out and not enough to hold the rest of the album up.

Maybe it’s the 80s vibe that’s throughout the album (and cover), that never seems to do much but season the songs with synth. Maybe it’s an overuse of effects, warping Dan Reynolds’ vocals for little benefits. The self-doubt of the previous albums that created “Shots” and “Polaroid” is gone, replaced with a much healthier outlook on life and self. And I always find that harder to relate to.

“I Don’t Know Why” starts off the album, without the oomph of “Radioactive” or self-destructiveness of “Shots”. It’s a fine song, one that might have been better suited as a middle track but it fails as the curtain riser. I suppose it does introduce the eighties synths we’ll be hearing throughout, but it doesn’t really have a hook of its own.

“Whatever It Takes” would have worked much better as an opener. Reynolds feels more at home and at speed with this song. Lyrics like “Whip, whip, run me like a racehorse” are catchy and the chorus is the kind you want to sing loud to inspire others around you, even if the protest. The bridge is smooth, slowing Reynolds’ rapping down to more of a conversation. It’s a strong track and a standout.

I’m sure I don’t need to talk about “Believer” that much. The song has been playing for months, the Dolph Lundgren-starring music video racking up the views. This one feels like Imagine Dragons 101. Put this on right after “Radioactive” and they would fit perfectly. Its the most bombastic song on the album, for sure. While it’s not a new favorite for me, it feels right at home with the band.

“Walking the Wire” is a return to the 80s. The chorus is catchy and and reminds me of a song Michael Jackson never wrote. The echo and layers have come straight out of 1987. Unfortunately, the rest of the song is forgettable, leaving little impression. “Rise Up” fairs a little better, even if it feels like the non-identical twin of “Walking the Wire”.

Then there’s the Huey Lewis and the News inspired, “I’ll Make It Up To You”. From the opening notes, to the chord choices and lyrics of the chorus, this reminds me of “If This Is It”.. Reynolds even sounds like he’s doing an impression of Lewis. I’d be surprised if Imagine Dragons didn’t do this on purpose, because the imitation is spot on. Maybe that’s why I like the song, cheese and all.

And maybe that’s why I don’t love “Yesterday”. If the previous song is a spot on impression of the News, than this track is a bad take on Queen, from the layered shouts to the guitar solo, to the hopefully-not-intended Freddie Mercury inflections. And while I tend not to mind Imagine Dragons love for effects stacking on one another, there’s too much going on in this song. Others might disagree, but this is a track that’s most likely to be skipped in the future.

“Mouth OF The River” has a pretty unattractive guitar during the verses, but the chorus is fine. A bit U2, but fine. Actually, there’s U2 sprinkled all around this album, mainly in the chords progressions inside most choruses. Take from that what you will.

If I’ve seemed harsh, let me admit, “Thunder” has been playing non-stop on my work computer. There’s nothing complicated about this song, the lyrics are almost criminally simple. But the story of the song is sly and snarky and when that chorus comes in, it’s got me hooked. The drum’s “boom boom boom” thunder, the repetition of the one word finding a surprising rhythm, that high pitch voice, it all works. It’s short and it hasn’t left the loop inside my brain. And the music video is weird as heck.

“Start Over” is too much cheese, even for me. The chorus, again sounding like a reject from Genesis or Belinda Carlisle, isn’t anything special. But the rest feels like a chore. And, fair warning, “Dancing In The Dark, is not a cover of the Bruce Springsteen song. It’s also a weak ending for the album. Reynolds’ voice is auto tuned the whole track and nothing about feels inspired. It’s too much, especially over a fairly relaxed beat.

Over the past year, I’ve seen a lot of critics complain about Imagine Dragons, complaining about pointless layering and meaningless sounds. I’ve never understood that, as I really enjoy the band and their previous albums. And I still don’t agree with them. Even though I don’t love Evolve, the band has a unique sounds and can be a lot of fun. I find a lot of their songs reflective, exciting and just plain catchy. Evolve has less of that, but it’s not a total loss. As someone still using cds in his car, I doubt I’ll be picking this one over Smoke + Mirrors, but I would want some of Evolve on a playlist. The album seems like it came easy to the band, but it doesn’t make for compelling music.

Humanz – An Album Review

humanzgorillazI know the album came out at the end of March and maybe I should have reviewed it then, but that method seems so strange to me. I like having read reviews for new albums when they’re released, but I can’t do it myself. For me, your perception of an album, you’re true feelings for it, develop over time. I didn’t actually like the Postal Service’s Give Up until owning it for two years and then one day it just clicked and now it’s one of my five favorites of all time. But if I had reviewed it the day I got it, I’d look like a darn fool!

That’s the way it has worked all my life. The Red Hot Chili Peppers’ By the Way, the Gorillaz’ Demon Days, even David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars all took sometime to become favorites and for me to really understand what the album was saying. It’s why I’ll probably be reviewing the Chili Peppers’ The Getaway soon, even though it’s a year old. Music, maybe more than books and movies, needs time to grow.

But let’s talk about Humanz, the fifth Gorillaz album and first since 2010’s The Fall. The first thing I want to say is that it definitely feels like a Gorillaz album. In the seven years it’s taken for this album to happen, the sound, while still varied, is in the vein of the band. Yes, they’re eclectic, but the hip-hop electronic vibes still rule over traditional rock. This album is more “Dare” than “Clint Eastwood”.

Humanz is a political album that saw the worst coming and decided to throw a party. The first song proper, after one-of-many interludes, “Ascension” is a very raw and in-your-face introduction. Featured artist Vince Staples is a doorman with a doomsday sign and some angry words to share. I’ll admit, I didn’t like this song at first, but it slowly grew on me and now it feels like the only song that could start the album.

Next is “Strobelite”, a refugee from the 70s, featuring a very soulful Peven Everett. After that, we have “Saturnz Barz”. This is the first song on the album that sounds like classic Gorillaz and that’s mostly attributed to Damon Albarn finally showing up with his signature nasally whine. The song features Popcaan and has the right spooky galactic soundscape to make you feel lonely while you nod your head.

“Momentz” with De La Soul is a song that, again, didn’t click with me when I first heard it. There’s something so weird about the song, the music is heavy and and the bridge seems not to fit. But De La Soul brings so much charisma and confidence to his rap that when the bridge ends and the song kicks it up a notch, you’re jamming harder than you have throughout the album.

“Submission”, featuring Danny Brown and Kelela is a fun, relaxed tune that works because Kelela has a great voice and adds real emotion to the track. “Charger”, with  Grace Jones, is the most rock song on Humanz. With that repeated, distorted alarm, it stands out as an aggressive tune that grabs you by the ears.

I’ve mentioned before that I think the Gorillaz have a classic sound, one that if I hear it, I think of their work on Demon Days. “Andromeda” has that, though it’s not necessarily a track that would have fit on that album. It’s probably the most relaxing track, while still creating that cosmic soundscape “Saturnz Barz” started.

“Busted and Blue” is solo Albarn and it’s my least favorite track,, due to it’s also the dullest. It’s a slow, mournful song, but it’s a bit too plodding to get the job done. Luckily, “Carnival” brings in the weird, with a heartbeat drum and Anthony Hamilton’s creepy lyrics that create the image of a dilapidated waterfront park brought back to life, Frankenstein style.

One of the most charged, claustrophobic tracks is “Let Me Out”. From the opening keys, there’s something stressful here. To describe it, I’m going to just post my favorite lyrics from the song,”

Look into my eyes, mama, tell me what you see
Tell me there’s a chance for me to make it off the streets
Tell me that I won’t die at the hands of the police
Promise me I won’t outlive my nephew and my niece
Promise me my pastor isn’t lyin’ as he preach
Tell me that they’ll listen if it’s lessons that I teach
Tell me there’s a heaven in the sky where there is peace
But until then, I keep my piece in arm’s reach”

The hopelessness is potent, the wide-eyed hope for anything better is heartbreaking. Pusha T, the featured artist on the track, just wants to hear you promise him these things he know won’t be real. Even if you look him in the eye and say, “I promise”, he knows the hand has already been dealt. The music in the song is killer and it’s the lyrics should hit you like a bullet. It’s a standout track.

Changing the tone, you have “Sex Murder Party”. It’s wacky and sorrowful, with Albarn’s haunting chorus. It has a haunted house vibe with spirits stuck in an unending party. It’s hedonism at its worst, sucking you in because the world outside just got worse on November 2016. What else can we do but celebrate the end of the world?

We can dance, that’s what we can do. Especially to “She’s My Collar”, in which Albarn coyly raps about the girl who’s driving him crazy. It’s 80s cheese for sure, but it’s groovy and  Kali Uchis’ vocals are so off-center you can’t help but smirk. It’s all neon lights down this street.

“Hallelujah Money” was the first track released January 19, 2017, the day before the inauguration and, boy howdy, does it feel like many of us did on that day. Featuring Benjamin Clementine’s smooth and deep vocals, which croon poetry against a choir reciting the title of the track, the song is haunting. It’s a eulogy asking, “How will we know, when the morning comes, we are still human?” How will we know?

It’s not all the doom and gloom. I mean, there’s a lot of that, yes. But there’s hope at the end of the tunnel. “We Got the Power”, featuring Jehnny Beth and choir that includes Noel Gallagher, is an anthem of choice. No matter how bad things get, no matter what the Powers That Be choose, “We got the power to be loving each other, no matter what happens.” It’s a much needed adrenaline shot after “Hallelujah Money” and ends the album on a surprisingly optimistic note. Maybe, after the passive-aggressive party, we can get over the hangover and do something to delay the apocalypse.

Take out the interludes and you have a fourteen track album that moves at a brisk pace. It doesn’t reach the heights of Demon Days, but that’s because it lacks the focus. While all the songs belong on the same album, they don’t connect and compliment each other the way the Gorillaz’ sophomore record did. I’ve seen Humanz compared to a mix-tape and that’s not far off, but it’s an extremely focused mix, impressing everyone who finds it in their car.

b7b8c7e9I don’t like saying albums are better or worse than previous works of artists I love. It seems pointless. Albums are good or bad in different ways, but they don’t need to compete. Led Zeppelin’s fourth album is better or worse because of the quality of Houses of the Holy. And I can’t say Humanz is better than what’s come before but it does feel like a real comeback. My taste tends to run closer to Demon Days, which should be evident by now considering how much I’ve mentioned that album as opposed to the others. It’s that taste that digs Humanz and your mileage might vary. There’s a lot of great thoughts and messages in these songs, but if you don’t care for hip-hop, electronica, sampling and after parties, you might not get far enough in to taste the meat. For the rest, it’s a timely, strobe light filled house party.

Let’s just agree to not have to wait another seven years.

A Mumford & Sons Template

I love the band but it dawned on me today that most of their songs follow a specific format. Maybe you disagree with me, maybe I had too much Coke. Here’s what I came up with.

The quiet part
(You should turn this up, bro. I can’t hear anything)

The words. Most likely the will include the following;
Heart, You, Find, Dark, F**k, Won’t

The Loud Part
(Turn it down, bro. I can’t hear over the music)

The Instrumental Part
(Strings and Brass)

The part where they go
Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhahhhhhhhhhhhhahhhhhhhhhh

The end
(That’s a dope song, bro)

The part where you ask you’re friend to stop calling you bro all the time. Seriously, what’s with him lately? Ever since his girlfriend left him for a job overseas he’s been totally annoying. He either needs to meet someone else or buy an X-Box.