All the Books Show: Episode 224 – Goodreads Choice Awards 2019

Oh, hey, it’s the Goodreads Choice Awards! Getting less important every year!

I like a good book award. More than something like the Oscars. But, this award is outliving it’s usefulness. Look, if you voted for The Institute by Stephen King as best horror, you were wrong and wrong to do so. Outside of that book being one of my least favorite reads in a while, it’s in no way horror. Scifi-lite, but not horor.

These awards are really starting to feel like, “Oh, I know that name, sure, I’ll vote…CLICK!” and that means I have less and less time for them each year.

Anyway, we talk the winners.

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See you next week, podcats!

All the Books Show: Episode 223 – Favorite Books of the Decade

It’s already been a decade? Wait, from when? Why don’t we do this every year? Anniversary things like this are dumb, why do we do them? Who cares how old The Matrix is. Ramble, ramble, ramble…

The point is, we talk about our favorite books of the decade. Not the most important books and all that. Literally the books we liked from the decade. Which means your favorite books didn’t make it! Maybe next decade!

Decade. That would be a cool name, right? “Hello, my name is Officer Jacobs and this is my partner, Decade. He’s the best there is at Robocide cases like this and we’re going to find out who deleted your husband.”

You can follow us on SoundcloudYoutube or iTunes and even Twitter! I’m sure there’s another, cool platform I’m forgetting but you can follow us on that too!

See you next week, podcats!

Book Review – The Andromeda Evolution

the-andromeda-evolutionI thought for sure I was done reviewing Michael Crichton books. I mean, the man passed away in 2008. But, I guess CrichtonSun is a thing now and it seems that The Andromeda Evolution is the beginning of a Crichton-verse. What does the future hold for this line? Will all of Crichton’s books start getting sequels? Is this the expanded universe of the techno-thriller. How long until, piece by piece, these books start to take place in the same universe? Will the gorillas from Congo be recruited by Jack Forman from Prey to stop Elizabeth Halpern from Sphere from using her powers to resurrect the Eaters of the Dead from Eaters of the Dead? Will they bring Westworld into it? How small is the market for Crichton-related references like that?

Written by Daniel H. Wilson, The Andromeda Evolution is is not a lost manuscript or unfinished work. This is an original sequel by the Robopocalypse author. Back when I first read that book, I couldn’t help but notice the similarities between Wilson and Crichton. But, with that book, Wilson was obviously influenced by Crichton’s style. Here, with The Andromeda Evolution, Wilson is trying to mimic Crichton and he can never get the trick to work. You can wear your dad’s hand-me-downs, but it doesn’t mean they fit.

The Andromeda Evolution takes place fifty years after the first Andromeda Strain. The first conceit that took me a second to get through is that this sequel treats the first book as a scientific report released to the public by author Michael Crichton. Luckily, the book doesn’t dwell on that and goes right into this new story. The Andromeda Strain seems to be back, this time in the jungles of South America and a team of four scientist is put together to figure out why, how and what needs to be done.

My biggest issue with this book is how excessively Wilson uses “Crichton-isms”. The first book, and most of Crichton’s writing, had these moments of foreshadowing or reminders that what we were reading was a debriefing, a post-report of the whole situation. And, to be fair, it’s been sometime since I picked up The Andromeda Strain. But, in this book, the amount of “this decision would prove to be fatal”, “inferred footage of the scene shows”, “little did he know, he had determined the fate of four billion people” and all that becomes too much. Perhaps, Crichton was better at following up on those little moments. Perhaps, time has faded those from my memory.

Crichton himself was never great at character work. Many of his protagonist were simply mouthpieces for his ideas and theories and, sometimes, dinosaur food. But, the characters in The Andromeda Evolution are, aside from one or two, incrediblely paper-thin. The backstories that Crichton would provide are lacking in detail with this book. Wilson, I know, can right characters I care about. I couldn’t put down Robopocalypse. But, in trying to ape the coldness of Crichton’s writing without the thoroughly thought-out histories, we’re left with action figures without much to say.

That’s sort of the problem throughout. Wilson is a skilled writer who can write science fiction and action and loves his robotics, but he doesn’t have the interesting ideas of Crichton. There’s no science or theories so detailed and compelling that they feel like they could be their own book, no musings about the danger of our technology that we haven’t seen before. Many of these thoughts feel like Twitter comments made paragraphs. And, when the mysteries of this new Andromeda Strain are revealed, you begin to wonder why Wilson chose this project in the first place. He obviously has bigger things he wants to write about other than humanity dealing with a deadly microorganism. While what Wilson presents at the end of this book is interesting and would be something I’d want to read on it’s own, it no longer feels down to Earth. Some of Crichton’s concepts were so frightening you’d have to simply not think about them in order to live your life. The Andromeda Strain was that type of semi-realistic techno-thriller that, while very much science fiction, had a real world element. The Andromeda Evolution goes full blown science fiction and, while it might have it’s audience, it’s far and away from “smallness” of the original novel.

It took me longer to finish The Andromeda Evolution than any Crichton book or Wilson’s own Robopocalypse. It lacked the page-turning quality of either writers. There’s a twist or two I enjoyed, but the destination was not worth the rather dull journey. A promising start about the failures of human apathy becomes a tour through some rather uninteresting jungles and more.

And, look, I’ll keep reading these things. If they put out Michael Crichton’s The Greater Train Robbery by C.J. Box, I’ll read it. If these are the thing I’m weirdly dedicated to reading, fine. I’ll join the tradition of reading a late author’s universe like Tom Clancy and Robert B. Parker. I suppose that’s what Marvel comics are anyway. But, outside of current Crichton fans, I’m not sure who the audience for this book is. I’ll read anything with Crichton’s name on it, but the random browser? Will that name mean anything to them anymore?

I just hope the quality rises. Daniel H. Wilson is not a bad writer but he took on a task that’s not always so easy. Being influenced is one thing, but imitation is a lot harder.

All the Books Show: Interview with Michael Nesmith

In this episode, Nic interviews Michael Nesmith, legendary member of the Monkees, about his novel, The Long Sandy Hair of Neftoon Zamora!

It’s a great interview and Nesmith and a compelling listen. If you haven’t read his book, go join his book club over at his Facebook page!

You can follow us on SoundcloudYoutube or iTunes and even Twitter! I’m sure there’s another, cool platform I’m forgetting but you can follow us on that too!

See you next week, podcats!

Three Nice Things: Battlefield Earth

In this episode, Nic (of the All the Books Show!) and Crystal join me to try and come up with three nice things to say about the movie, Battlefield Earth! This was the hardest movie yet to come up with three nice things and it nearly broke me. But, the episode is a fun listen!

http://threenicethings.libsyn.com/battlefield-earth

Three Nice Things

Three Nice Things: Johnny Mnemonic

This episode of Three Nice Things is about the film, Johnny Mnemonic. I’m joined by Kendra and Marius, and they liked the movie way more than I did. Which, is to say, at all. I was a bit disappointed by Keanu Reeves, but I’ll forgive him.

Either way, we all say our nice things about the movie. Give it a listen!

http://threenicethings.libsyn.com/johnny-mnemonic

Three Nice Things

 

Three Nice Things: Super Mario Bros.

In this episode of Three Nice Things, we talk about the Super Mario Bros. movie! I’m joined by Kendra and Julia as we all try to say our nice things about this movie, and it’s a lot harder than I remember. Time normally heals wounds, but, this is an exception to the rule.

Give this episode a listen!

http://threenicethings.libsyn.com/super-mario-bros

Three Nice Things

 

Detective Pikachu/Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

The new Detective Pikachu trailer is lots of fun. In fact, after watching it a few times, I had to remember the last trailer that I thought was so unabashedly enjoyable. I was a bit surprised to realize it was way back when Thor: Ragnarok was coming out (though, that last Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse trailer was great too!).

So, I went back and watched the Thor trailer, went back to Detective Pikachu, had a thought, played them both at the same time and got enough inspiration to waste my Tuesday evening making this thing.

 

Book Review – I Kill Giants

51hXui6krmL._SX370_BO1,204,203,200_I’ve been having issues lately when trying to read Young Adult books. I don’t love teenage protagonist, in books or movies. I find the range teenage characters have for drama, when written for a young adult audience, to be limiting or, more often than not, dull. It’s very relationship based, which I don’t mind a sampling of, but, when it’s the main course, I’d rather skip it all together. And the teenage introspection! The narration! I can’t do it! Not anymore! Adults writing teenagers think they’re so darn clever and relevant because they mention last years movies or say “legit” or something like that, I can’t do it anymore and I won’t!

This has been a quick review for John Green’s Turtles All the Way Down.

Here’s the twist, though. Graphic novels fix this for me. There’s less inner monologues and more visual cues. Blankets or This One Summer nail the melancholy existentialism because they create mood in the art, not just through dated dialog. When we see how young a character is, they feel more real as a teenager because we’re not being told by a thirty-five year old how “legit” young they are. Also, I’m not sure if “legit” is something I’ve read people writing or just a new thing I’m doing now?

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Also, I should stop judging, because the book I wrote has teenage protagonist and they’re mopey and monologuey and now I’m legit worried I can’t stop saying legit…

I Kill Giants is written by Joe Kelly, whose always been one of the better writers in the world of Marvel comics. It tells the story of a girl who doesn’t fit in at school, who’s going through some heavy stuff in her family life and who might also fight giants. The giants thing is up in the air, but there’s a good chance it’s real. Or maybe it’s all in her head. Or real.

This self-contained graphic novel is sneaky. You go in expecting a certain type of story, maybe similar to Anya’s Ghost or In Real Life and, while there’s fantastical elements, you get something more akin to This One Summer. I Kill Giants is lighter on it’s feet than Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki’s novel, all while dealing with loneliness and loss without bringing down the party. J. M. Ken Niimura’s art could be described as big, similar to Ed Mcguinness’ style of comic art, but the black and white illustrations stand without the need of bold colors. The lack of color even makes the beach seem more lonesome and magical. There’s a pacing in this book, with the writing and art, that matches superhero comics, but this is completely accessible to people who dislike capes and masks.

18888318It’s hard to talk about I Kill Giants without giving away important moments. The ending is reliant on the book’s whole concept of truth vs. fiction, of dealing with problems or ignoring them. I could tell you about the book’s bullying or the friendship that forms, or the only guidance concealer that I’ve ever wished was real, but there’s too much that should be read without knowing the truth out the gate. I will say this book made me cry, and it might have been a while since a young adult title had that effect on me.

This seems to me like it’s been a badly written review. Take it as more of a recommendation wrapped in some rants. This book is great and should be considered essential reading for the young adult graphic medium. With a movie coming out this year, hopefully more will discover this book, because it shouldn’t be missed.

All the Books Show: Episode 129 – All the Books Anticipation 2018!

This episode, we talk about the adult books coming out in 2018. But, we still have the excitement of young readers. You got to feel young to stay young, you know?

Lots of books coming out this year, but not a lot catching me eye. On the podcast, I point out that I’m never very up-to-date on books released during the year. Sometimes, if something really grabs my attention, like The Girls or Exit West, I’ll give in. But, it’s rare.

Anything you’re looking forward to? Let me know, and maybe you convince me to be excited too!

You can follow us on SoundcloudYoutube or iTunes and even Twitter! I’m sure there’s another, cool platform I’m forgetting but you can follow us on that too!

See you next week, podcats!